Heart & Soul

A Food Hub With Heart & Soul in Polson, Montana

Putting food from local farm fields onto dinner tables in Polson, Montana, (pop. 5,000) is about healthy eating and a whole lot more.

The Polson Food Hub, part of the Montana Co-op, is a place where people not only pick up locally produced food, they might also stop by to take boxing lessons, make salsa, learn how to mix and record music or try traditional tribal dance.

The community-minded approach at the Co-op was guided by the Community Heart & Soul™ project that took place there from 2012 to 2014, said Jason Moore, president and founder of the Co-op. 

“During my first few meetings as a Heart and Soul volunteer, I kept hearing the word ‘collaboration.’ This has a very similar meaning to cooperation, so I felt the importance of working on this project,” Moore recalled. 

Moore headed up a Heart & Soul committee that held 19 neighborhood gatherings, and he observed lots of overlap between what the Co-op aspired to and what Polson residents envisioned for their community.  Better access to locally grown food was just one the shared aspirations.

 “When the Montana Co-op was looking for Food Hub locations in Polson, we were looking for a building that could not just support local food growth. We looked at the values people presented during the Heart & Soul program,” Moore said. “The number one item mentioned during Heart & Soul gatherings was that Polson needed a place for the kids to hang out; an activity and event center.  Along the way, we met other community partners that had a passion for health, youth outreach, and community connectivity.  These people have further developed the Montana Co-op’s mission to bring people together to create easy and affordable access to local food and Montana-made products. We’re now fulfilling many other needs of the community, with exercise, education classes, and getting our youth hooked on good things.”

Here is a summary of  the  areas in which the Co-op aligns with  needs identified by Polson residents as part of their Heart & Soul project:

Heart & Soul Action: Offer a facility that brings people together. Build an event center for year-round activities and events. Host more community-wide educational events, including art/cultural events and activities.

Jason Moore: The Co-op includes an activity center for all ages with diverse events and education programming.  We have created a place for the kids to hang out and get hooked on good things.
     
H&S Action: Bring tribal and non-tribal residents together in economic ventures and cultural cooperation.

JM: The tribal mural on the outside of the Co-op building is one example.  The Co-op is also working with the tribe on projects targeting at-risk youth and developing cultural reconnections and classes to enhance Native American heritage.

H&S Action:  Develop a plan for filling up the closed storefronts downtown.

 JM: The Co-op is in the early stages of fulfilling a plan to contribute to reopening more closed storefronts.  This plan includes an incubator that supports new and existing businesses with all types of start-up and development services including accounting, marketing, operations, technology, and administrative support. 

H&S Action: Teach job skills that can provide a local skilled workforce after
high school graduation.

JM: The Kids Co-op offers classes including music, art, robotics, aerial gymnastics, career identification, nutrition, food preparation, and business classes.

Watch a video about the Food Hub. 

Heart & Soul Minute: A Co-op with Heart & Soul in Polson, Montana from Orton Family Foundation on Vimeo.

Keying in on What Matters Most

In Laconia, New Hampshire, nearly 100 residents turned out recently to weigh in on the things that matter most to them about their lakeside town.

Laconia is in the midst of a Community Heart & Soul ™ project called Reimagine Laconia that aims to inform the town's master plan. In the months leading up to the community meeting, volunteers fanned out across the community gathering stories and input from a broad range of residents in the city’s three main neighborhoods. The aim now was to learn how well the emerging Heart & Soul themes were aligning with community sentiment.

Using keypad polling, attendees were asked to rank ten shared Heart & Soul themes:  community character; sense of community; connectivity; a healthy, beautiful environment; a strong economy; an engaging responsible accessible government; demographic diversity; a safe community; quality of life; a positive story.

Getting answers and seeing results in real time engaged the audience, turning observers into participants in a way that would have been challenging with a group this size. Keypad polling also allowed everyone and every viewpoint to be “heard,” even those not comfortable speaking at a public meeting.  

The polling showed that three community themes rose to the top: a strong economy; a healthy, beautiful environment; a safe community. These were also the three areas that respondents felt the city could make progress on in the near future.

Overall, the meeting affirmed that the Heart & Soul team was on the right track in characterizing Laconia’s heart and soul. The event also yielded another positive outcome, perhaps less expected.

“Judging from our feedback, the most valuable aspect of the keypad polling event was the transparent process,” said Brandee Loughlin, assistant planner with the city. “People really liked witnessing the results in real-time, right in front of them.  It went a long way to building that trust in the process and in the information we had been sharing.”  

Five Things You Can Do Today to Start Discovering Your Town's Heart & Soul

 

Did you catch our Heart & Soul Training:  Intro to Building Better Communities on February 26th?  If not you can watch the webinar. (See below.)

Intro to Building Better Communities provides an overview of Community Heart & Soul and how it transforms rural towns and small cities with our signature barn-raising approach to community planning and development. 

In the meantime, here are some things you can do NOW to set you on the path to discovering your community’s heart and soul.   

Here are five things you can do today: 

1.  Start noticing who and what makes up your community.  Go outside of your usual patterns:

  • Drive a different way home to check out new neighborhoods.
  • Take a walk during lunch hour and observe your surroundings.  Notice the sidewalks, buildings, trees, houses, green spaces, a river or other natural features and consider whether they benefit your community or detract from it.

2.  Step out of your comfort zone:

  • Sincerely compliment a stranger.
  • Ride the bus (if you don’t already—if so, a different line) and do some people watching.
  • Go to an event such as a festival or game dinner that you have never experienced.  Who is there you’ve never met? Do you run into friends you haven’t seen in months or even years? Did you feel welcome?

3.  Start noticing how the people in your community fall into different groups, clubs, and faith based organizations, etc. Observe how and if they interact and communicate.

4.  Invite your friends and/or colleagues to coffee (or even an adult beverage) to learn what they love about where they live and how they'd like to make it better.

5. Download the free Community Heart & Soul Field Guide! http://fieldguide.orton.org/main-sign-up2

Here's the webinar:

Ohio Town Selected as First Community Heart & Soul™ Project in Midwest

image of McComb

McComb, Ohio has been selected for a Community Heart & Soul™ project, the foundation’s first Midwestern town. Orton is partnering with the Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation on the two-year community development project.

McComb, a small town in northwest Ohio, was selected in a competitive process to receive a $130,000 Community Foundation grant for the project. The project is envisioned as a pilot for future partnerships between the Community Foundation and towns and villages in the county, Orton Family Foundation Executive Director David Leckey said.

“I’d like to congratulate the townspeople of McComb on being selected for a Community Heart & Soul project. We look forward to working closely with McComb residents and Community Foundation staff to ensure a process that involves everyone in the community and lays a solid foundation for planning McComb’s future based on what matters most to the people who live there,” said Leckey, who is a native of Hancock County where McComb is located. “This project launches a strategy to have the Community Foundation facilitate Community Heart & Soul projects in additional towns in the county.”

Community Heart & Soul is an approach to community development and planning developed by the Orton Family Foundation that increases participation in local decision-making and invites residents to shape the future of their communities based on what matters most to them.

Hancock County (pop. 74,782) is in a predominantly agricultural area of northwest Ohio, about 50 miles south of Toledo. The county is comprised of 10 villages varying in population from approximately 200 to 1,600 that lie within 17 townships. Findlay, where the Community Foundation is based, is the county seat and the largest community in the county with a population of 41,202. McComb’s population, including another village and two townships that comprise the local school district, is approximately 4,000. The largest industry in the town is Hearthside Food Solutions, a contract maker of baked goods.

In McComb’s proposal townspeople expressed a readiness to focus on revitalizing the downtown. The Heart & Soul Committee evaluating proposals saw McComb at a crucial juncture, Community Foundation President Katherine Kreuchauf said. 

“With infrastructure in place and poised for growth, including a water tower slated for completion in June and a wastewater treatment plant with ample capacity, McComb is at a potential pivot point. We felt this was a crucial moment in McComb’s history and that Heart & Soul could really help the village to shape its future with involvement from everyone in the community,” Kreuchauf said. “The Hancock County Heart & Soul application and site visit process was inspiring. Hancock County is vibrant and full of people who care deeply about their communities. Choosing the first Hancock County Heart & Soul community was a difficult decision. We are very excited about the Heart & Soul partnership with McComb.” 

The McComb Community Heart & Soul project is funded by a two-year, $136,420 grant from the Community Foundation and with staff support from Orton and the Community Foundation. McComb will be eligible for training and technical assistance in addition to the grant and will contribute 1,500 hours of volunteer time as a match.

Putting Heart & Soul Into Words (and Action)

It can be hard to put into words—the magic that happens when Community Heart & Soul™ takes hold in a town.

Sometimes we refer to “it” as the secret sauce. “It” is also the tipping point when people go from focusing on what’s wrong with their town to seeing what’s possible. “It” is when a developer senses that good things are happening in a place and decides to invest in a vacant building downtown. “It” is when a longtime resident realizes her town is worth her time and runs for city council. “It” is when storytelling builds a bridge to a group that has traditionally been isolated. 

“It” is Community Heart & Soul.

The transformative power of Community Heart & Soul can be tough to describe, but the steps to get there are now clearly spelled out in our new Community Heart & Soul™ Field Guide.

After nearly a decade of listening, learning, refining, and listening some more, with our staff on the ground in small towns in New England and the Rocky Mountain West, the Orton Family Foundation is ready to share with you our field-tested method that leads to stronger towns. 

Our Field Guide, available as a free download, spells out step-by-step how to inspire residents to shape the future of their communities, based on what matters most to them.

We know it works. We’ve seen the results. Here are a few examples:

  • In Biddeford, Maine, Heart & Soul contributed to a solid community plan that sparked revitalization. In the past nine months, 144,000 square feet have been leased in a former mill, something that was expected to take two years. There are now 85 businesses in the mill complex. On Main Street, 19 new businesses have moved in in the past two years.
  • Cortez, Colorado has created trusting and productive relationships with community members. Kirsten Sackett, director of planning and building said, “They’re understanding more about what the city does. I’m understanding their needs more. … It’s not so much about process and paperwork anymore.”
  • When a controversial proposal to change how the town votes on its budget came up, the city council in Essex, Vermont turned to Heart & Soul of Essex to take the lead in organizing a community-wide conversation on the issue, moving it from conflict to consensus.

The Community Heart & Soul approach sets the stage for new leaders to emerge. Liz Subin, former coordinator of Essex Heart & Soul, decided to run for state legislature in Vermont. Golden, Colorado City Councilor Saoirse Charis-Graves never envisioned herself running for office until Heart & Soul helped her see how she could make a difference.

This is a small sample of the positive results that illustrate the transformative power of Community Heart & Soul. Maybe your town is next.

To learn more, please join us for a free Heart & Soul Matters talk, Community Heart & Soul: Building a Blueprint for Successful Small Towns from 4-5 p.m. Eastern on Wednesday, Nov 5.  You’ll hear from me and Director of Programs Alece Montez-Griego with an overview of the approach. Heart & Soul veterans Mike Bestor, city manager, Golden, Colorado, and Delilah Poupore, executive director of Heart of Biddeford, will also be on hand to discuss how Heart & Soul has strengthened their towns. Click here to learn more and register.

Meantime, whether you are a city planner, elected official or a resident concerned about your town’s future, I hope you will take a moment to download the Field Guide and start the conversation about strengthening the social, cultural and economic vibrancy of your town.

David Leckey

Executive Director

Translating Values to Action in Gardiner, Maine

 
In Gardiner, Maine this summer residents may find themselves taking in free concerts on the waterfront, watching movies in a mini park or enjoying the flowers in public gardens.
 
These initiatives and seven others underway in this small city on the Kennebec River are a direct result of the Community Heart & Soul planning process that wrapped up earlier this year.
 
Gardiner wasted no time in moving from their shared community values to action with the awarding by the Foundation of $25,000 in Heart & Soul Implementation Grants that will leverage investment in the community valued at $400,000.
 
“We’ve been waiting for two years to get to this point. For me this is the reward for putting in the effort,” said Patrick Wright, executive director of Gardiner Main Street, an organization that played a lead role in Gardiner Heart & Soul. 
 
Gardiner’s Action Plan reaches a broad range of community members, from businesses with a “Buy Local” campaign and business plan competition, to kids with an activity park, and teens with a prom gown service. Some Action Plan initiatives focus on benefits that will be enjoyed immediately like free concerts and movies. Others are longer range, including planning for a food cooperative and funding for the Duct Tape Council to make sure Gardiner stays on track with its Community Action Plan. 
 
“The wide range of projects is a result of going through Heart & Soul and inviting different community groups into the process, which is easy to say and not easy to do,” said Pat Hart, a city councilor and business owner who chairs the city’s Comprehensive Planning Committee. 
 
The results definitely bear testament to the hard work of Gardiner’s community members, said David Leckey, Orton's executive director.
 
“Helping communities find ways to take action around shared community values is why the Orton Family Foundation exists. We are thrilled to see this happening,” Leckey said.
 
Wright agreed.
 
“One of the things Heart & Soul has done is make the community believe in itself. The Implementation Grants are key because they have allowed us to identify projects that speak to the core of what moves this community forward. To see $25,000 go this far and wide with this number of projects is remarkable,” Wright said.
 
Here are the 10 Action Plan initiatives just awarded Heart & Soul Implementation Grants:
 
  • Cobbossee Corridor Design Charrette: Funding for an architectural design charrette for trails and building reuse along the Cobbossee Stream in conjunction with federal EPA Brownfields environmental assessment grant.  Implementation Grant: $6,000. Project cost: $40,000.
  • Gardiner Main Street (GMS) Growth Initiative: Funding for a business plan competition for start-ups that would not otherwise be eligible for funding as part of the GMS Growth Initiative. Implementation Grant: $5,000. Project cost $190,000.
  • Kennebec Local Food Initiative: For developing a downtown food co-op. Implementation Grant: $5,000. Project cost: $136,000.
  • Duct Tape Council: To ensure implementation of the Community Action Plan, pursue Gardiner’s community values, and ensure continuity of the Heart & Soul planning process. Implementation Grant: $2,000. Project cost: $4,000.
  • Outdoor Concerts: For five free concerts on the waterfront from May to September. Implementation Grant: $2,000. Project cost: $4,000.
  • Buy Local Campaign: To fund logo, signs, and website for campaign. Implementation Grant: $2,000. Project cost: $12,000.
  • Cinderella Project: To provide prom dresses to high school students who could not otherwise afford them. Implementation Grant: $1,000. Project cost: $3,540.
  • Outdoor Movies: For three free outdoor movies during the summer. Implementation Grant: $1,000. Project cost: $2,000.
  • Activity Park: Funding to begin planning for an activity park. Implementation Grant: $500. Project cost: $1,000.
  • Gardiner’s Gardeners: To provide materials to area merchants for downtown and public space beautification. Implementation Grant: $500. Project cost: $3,000.

Five Tips: Using Community Values to Make Tough Decisions

Our Community Heart & Soul approach to planning asks folks to ask each other, “What matters most?” because we believe in the power of shared values to shape better futures.  When enough people agree on the qualities of their town they care most about, everyone is better connected with each other and the community. Those strengthened ties inspire people to work together to protect and enhance what they care about. We know, because we have seen it happen. 

We’ve been along for the ride as places like Polson, Montana discovered their shared commitment to a natural environment and a healthy, active lifestyle.  In Colorado’s North Fork Valley, residents identified freedom, independence and personal responsibility as a key community value.  Essex, Vermont’s six core values include thoughtful growth and community connections. The content may differ from place to place, but we know first hand that the positive impact on social cohesion of defining and describing shared values is universal. 
 
Agreed-upon shared values help bind people together, and there are many, many ways that communities can uphold them to build stronger and more vibrant places.  But all communities face the same challenge:  They only have so much money, so much time, so many people offering their skills.  With increasingly limited resources, how can communities make choices about what actions are most important?
 
Here are five tips for using community values to help make decisions based on what matters most:

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Tired of Being Stuck? New Leaders Can Help

One of the greatest barriers to change in small cities and towns is that we’re stuck.  Town staff don’t always have the time or resources to implement plans or take on new ideas. Community members are invited to offer feedback on plans and policies at public hearings, but they’re rarely invited to less intimidating, formal gatherings to share ideas, much less encouraged to initiate action on those plans and policies.  People are stuck in old roles, old mindsets and old habits. And the press of what needs to get done—often on a shoestring, doesn’t help make room to pick our heads up and think differently.    

Being stuck plays out in many ways —the plan sitting on a shelf collecting dust; the same ten people showing up to every meeting; the vote going against a proposal after many opportunities for input. 

Heart & Soul offers a path for communities to get unstuck, and also unlock the potential of residents to take action and responsibility.  To counter the untouched plan, Heart & Soul ties a community vision to early and achievable actions.  To involve more people, Heart & Soul insists on building trust and relationships first.  And, as local officials and staff meet residents on their own turf, conversations become more genuine and concerns are aired more freely before a decision is made or a bond vote appears on the ballot. 

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